1. web boss crossed 500 subscribers on YouTube
  2. Published seven articles on Medium
  3. Crossed 100 followers on Medium
  4. Published my third npm package and used it to solve a problem at work
  5. Worked with GitHub actions for the first time to setup auto-publish to npm for “4”
  6. Had my first partying/clubbing experience
  7. Started going to church a little early
  8. Changed church (WIP)
  9. Worked with friends to release the shortest course on frontend development
  10. Finally learnt to mind my business/Stopped giving a damn generally
  11. Still figuring out this work-life-balance thing
  12. Someone who was owing me money for close to two years finally paid back
  13. Worked with the team at FourthCanvas to document and handoff a codebase to a major client
  14. Had a viral tweet
  15. My team finally started doing shorter standups
  16. Came back on WhatsApp.

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No hashtags, I made an innocent tweet and it blew up 🔥

I expected my followers to increase but it didn’t move one bit — I wish I could swear but then it clicked! these people liked the tweet not me; they don’t know who I am and do not give a damn about me — they shouldn’t.

So, what did I do? I started following the people who liked the post and they started following back. By now showing interest in the people who already liked something I put out, they now showed interest in me.

Of course, not everybody followed but I got at least a 100 followers in 24hours. Argue with my twitter analytics dashboard.

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Asking for more

If there is anything at all everyone learnt from “Economics” — it is that human wants are insatiable or better put, human wants cannot be satisfied. Meaning you cannot satisfy anyone. Stop trying! Do your best and sip cold zobo.

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I will assume you already know what GitHub Actions and environment variables are, and you only need a quick guide to know where to put your environment variable for a GitHub action so I will get straight to it.

  1. On the repo, you want to create an environment variable, click on the “Settings” tab.
  2. On the sidebar, scroll down and look for “Secrets” (yeah you guessed right, GitHub calls environment variables secrets) then click on “Actions”
  3. Click on “New repository secret”. Enter the name of your secret(environment variable) and paste the value. Click “Add Secret” and you are done!

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